[ Nutrition ]

Novo Nordisk rejects diabetes drug Victoza complaint


Sorry, Victoza. Patients taking the 3 mg dose of the drug, known chemically as liraglutide, had a mean loss of 5.9 percent of body weight. Like Victoza, the new weight loss treatment comes as in injectable drug and is intended for patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher and at least one weight-related health condition, such as diabetes. Similar to its sister drugs, Januvia and Byetta, Victoza acts like a hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The efficacy of IDegLira had already been assessed in Novo Nordisk’s phase II study, Dual I, in which IDegLira was found to be superior to liraglutide alone and non-inferior to insulin alone. “The positive surprise here is that so far dulaglutide had shown a similar clinical profile to competitor Bydureon in terms of A1C (blood glucose) lowering and Bydureon failed to show non-inferiority versus Victoza,” he said, referring to AstraZeneca’s weekly diabetes treatment from the same class. Joel Zonszein of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, who wasn’t involved in the trial, said according to the report that the study is the first to investigate just how effective liraglutide is for type 2 diabetes sufferers in terms of weight management for the higher dosage.

The study noted that people with type 2 diabetes who were taking Victoza had a slightly higher, though nonsignificant, risk of death and rehospitalization, as well as signs of worsening kidney function. But analysts had been especially anxious to see how it would fare against future rival Victoza.

Tags: , ,